Apartment search in Berlin

Apartment Hunting in Berlin

Finding the right apartment in Berlin

Berlin’s population is growing every year, with young people in particular drawn to the German capital. And no wonder! Few cities in the world are as celebrated for their creativity, cultural diversity, and international flair. On top of that, the city on the Spree offers a broad array of world-class museums, landmarks, and sights.Looking for your dream apartment in Berlin? With our help, you can quickly get a good sense of what’s out there – all available apartments, broken down by neighbourhood, rent, size, and room number. Find the offer that best suits you!

General overview of the Berlin housing market

Berlin is a booming and extraordinarily popular city that’s been growing steadily for years. With some 42,400 new arrivals in 2018, it’s now home to a population of 3.75 million. The German capital has become even more appealing thanks to extensive renovation of its historic buildings, significant infrastructure optimisation, and a generally vibrant and creative atmosphere. A mere 1.8 percent of the city’s residential properties are unoccupied, some of them only because they’re being renovated or refurbished. On top of that, Berlin’s birth rate is lower than its mortality rate, a consequence of the low average age of the new arrivals. In terms of real estate, what all of this adds up to is high demand in the face of limited supply.

Berlin by neighbourhood

If there’s one quality that defines the German capital it’s this: constant flux. You can see it reflected in individual neighbourhoods, several of which have undergone significant transformation in recent years. One thing, though, seems to never change: demand for apartments in Berlin grows every year. The real estate market here is diverse enough that there’s an apartment to suit virtually every need and taste. So whether you’re looking for an exclusive luxury loft in Mitte or a simple, affordable flat in a quieter neighbourhood, finding your dream home is virtually assured.

Every neighbourhood has its advantages – it all depends on what you’re looking for:

  1. Charlottenburg is well-connected by public transport and offers a wealth of recreational and leisure activities
  2. For true big-city flair, head to Berlin-Mitte, a neighbourhood rich in cultural institutions, nightlife options, and shopping opportunities
  3. You’ll find affordable apartments – along with plenty of bars, clubs, and young people – in the trendy neighbourhood of Friedrichshain, near the leafy Volkspark
  4. Adlersdorf boasts good infrastructure and close proximity to Köpenicker Altstadt, a charming historic quarter
  5. Especially beloved by students, young people, and artists, Kreuzberg is home to an abundance of cosy cafes and bars as well as the lovely Viktoriapark
  6. Ideal for families, Pankow is brimming with primary schools and serves as a convenient gateway to the countryside around Berlin

What to remember when you go to the viewing

You’ve found a place you like and are ready to arrange a viewing? If possible, try to schedule it for daytime; that way, you’ll have optimal lighting conditions and won’t overlook any flaws or defects. To that end, also be sure to take pictures of the living area (only, of course, if the owner consents). And remember to bring all the necessary documents with you: passport or other state ID, proof of income from the last three months, and your latest credit check (“Schufa”) or equivalent statement of self-disclosure. Evidence of rental payments to your current landlord is not mandatory, but it can certainly help. Pensioners, for their part, should be able to present documentation of their pension income. By bringing all the necessary paperwork with you right away, you’ll make life significantly easier for both yourself and the landlord.

Housing prices in Berlin

No matter whether you’re buying or renting, living in Berlin is not cheap. Overall, housing prices in the capital are higher than the German average. On top of that, more than half of all Berlin households are single-person, which has caused rents to spike for small flats up to 30 square metres in size. As a result, the price per square metre for small apartments is higher than that for larger homes.

The most expensive real estate can be found in the western part of the city. Charlottenburg, Dahlem, Grunewald, and neighbouring areas are among the most upscale in the city. The average net rent for a 60 square metre one-bedroom apartment in Charlottenburg, for example, is €995. The cost to purchase a comparable property is around €427,000. You’ll find more affordable real estate in the eastern part of the city in areas like Adlersdorf (Treptow). Here, you’ll pay about €715 net rent for a one-bedroom of 60 square metres, or €262,000 to purchase.

What to remember when you go to the viewing

You’ve found a place you like and are ready to arrange a viewing? If possible, try to schedule it for daytime; that way, you’ll have optimal lighting conditions and won’t overlook any flaws or defects. To that end, also be sure to take pictures of the living area (only, of course, if the owner consents). And remember to bring all the necessary documents with you: passport or other state ID, proof of income from the last three months, and your latest credit check (“Schufa”) or equivalent statement of self-disclosure. Evidence of rental payments to your current landlord is not mandatory, but it can certainly help. Pensioners, for their part, should be able to present documentation of their pension income. By bringing all the necessary paperwork with you right away, you’ll make life significantly easier for both yourself and the landlord.

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